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Speaking up for children: the DfE’s consultation on reforms to the EYFS

We’d like to start this blog by saying Happy New Year! We know it’s been a while since we last posted, but we are starting 2020 afresh with a New Year’s resolution to continue to contemplate childhoods with a new article every week. Thinking about our 2020 New Year’s resolution has made us reflect back …

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Rockabye baby: infants sleeping outdoors

You may remember in a previous post we told you about some research we are involved in which focuses on young children’s engagement (ie 0-2s) with the outdoors. The project is funded by the Froebel Trust and you can read about it here. One of the interesting things we have discovered through our reading is …

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Manifesto for young children: We will……

Did you get chance to read the recent children’s manifesto, Guess how much we love you:  Why politicians urgently need to help our children,  ? It was published by the children’s commissioner for England, Anne Longfield. In it she sets out the commitment that all political parties need to make to children to ensure they can …

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What does it mean to be ready for school?

This week we seem to have been talking to lots of people who are experiencing (or whose children are experiencing) transitions – into nurseries, childminders’ settings, primary schools, secondary schools and universities. Transitions can be an unsettling and uncertain time – taking on a new challenge, meeting a lot of new people and absorbing a …

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Summer’s over: How are children socialised to keep themselves safe?

Welcome back to the start of the new academic year; we hope you had a lovely summer and managed to have a little rest and recuperation time. One positive about taking a little time out, is that it gives you chance to put your brain in a different gear and reflect on life in a …

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Professional identity; who am I and how do others see me?

A poignant post this week from an early years practitioner who wishes to remain anonymous. Creeping towards 43 years old, with a career in early years that started when I was 16, I recently undertook a role as a nursery teacher in a maintained nursery class.  My experience within the early years sector is vast …

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Is this app ……appropriate?

Another great blog to get us thinking by Dr Paula Stone; let Paula know what you think about this initiative by adding your comments. This week (20 February), the Education Secretary Damian Hinds has announced the roll-out of free access to educational apps to families from disadvantaged backgrounds in a bid to boost early literacy …

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‘Get some fresh air’ – The importance of outdoor play

This week’s blog is written by Charlotte Hanks a final year Early Childhood Studies student.     Recently I have been reading ‘Swallows and Amazons’ by Ransome (1930).      I can’t help but think how lovely it is to read about the adventures these children have sailing and camping on an island with no adults around. However, …

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OfSTED’s proposed new guidelines for inspection. A step in the right direction?

Thank you Dr Paula Stone for another timely post. On Wednesday, I was heartened to hear the news about OfSTED’s plans to issue new guidelines for inspection that will shift the focus towards quality of education rather than purely educational ‘outcomes’ or attainment.  It is proposed that this will be the biggest overhaul of the inspection …

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‘Hungry, hungry, I am hungry…’; young children and food insecurity.

      When I taught in a primary school there was a Dr Seuss nonsense song that the children loved to sing with great enthusiasm. It was called The Super-Supper March and began ‘Hungry, hungry, I am hungry, I could eat a pickled plum...’. Do you remember it? Perhaps you sang it too. When I …

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Good words are worth much …. (George Herbert)

Dr. Paula Stone is Senior Lecturer at Canterbury Christ Church University. Her interests are class and education. I have been struck by the number of recent articles and debates around the use of social media and the impact that this is having on young people. As highlighted by Harriet Smithers in her recent blog which …

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Is this really the end of the era of austerity? What will this mean for children?

Thank you Dr. Paula Stone for once again giving us lots to ponder on in this week's post. Austerity is a term often bandied about in politics and the media; over recent years it seems to represent ‘a difficult economic situation caused by a government reducing the amount of money it spends’  i.e. not an economic …

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Boys’ toys and girls’ toys; why does it really matter?

  It’s half term already and finally it’s beginning to feel like autumn.  A quick stroll into town reminds us of all the celebrations that happen at this time of year; the shops are full of Halloween paraphernalia, there are reminders it is nearly Bonfire Night, and of course, the countdown to Christmas has already …

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Social media; are the fears surrounding children using social media limiting the positive benefits for young children?

A great post this week from Harriet Smithers who is an Early Childhood Studies student.     Children’s social media use is growing. This has been highlighted in Ofcom’s annual Children and Parent’s Media Attitudes report. The report highlights that 74% of children aged between 12 and 15 have a social media profile. As well …

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To share or not to share?

This week’s post has been written by Karen Matthews, an early years practitioner who has recently completed an MA in Early Childhood Education. Karen is sharing a thought-provoking reflection on how we teach children to share. Imagine this, you have been fitting together different shaped magnets to create a model; you have been at this …

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Play, talk, read, write, repeat

Did you see the new Literacy Trust report ‘Mental wellbeing, reading and writing’that came out this week? The research that underpins it looked to explore any links ‘between mental wellbeing and reading and writing enjoyment and attitudes’ (p. 25). It referenced other studies such as the Millennium Cohort Study which has found parallels between reading …

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Let’s hear it for the mums! The impact of a mother’s education on outcomes for her children.

It’s the beginning of a new academic year and the first years are arriving on campuses across the UK ready to continue their academic journey – and hopefully have a bit of fun, make some new friends and be inspired and challenged. There’s always one group of students my heart goes out to; those who …

Continue reading Let’s hear it for the mums! The impact of a mother’s education on outcomes for her children.